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Meet Eat Drink Think


A themed dining event to celebrate the contribution that Europe and Europeans have made to Scottish culture and cuisine, jointly hosted by the Centre for Open Learning at The University of Edinburgh, and the Edinburgh Food Studio.

Guests from the University of Edinburgh will bring ideas and points, providing inspiration for the kitchen, and discussion points for the dining table, more on those guests below:

Dr Pasquale Iannone

Teaching Fellow in Film Studies

 

 

Comfort and Joy; Scottish and Italian cuisine at the movies

A recent, exciting development in film studies, the audio-visual essay allows academics and critics to express critical ideas by re-editing and re-mixing images and sounds from the films themselves. In his 5-minute piece, Dr Pasquale Iannone (born in Edinburgh to an Italian family) will explore Scottish and Italian culture through food and drink and its representation in films such as Comfort and Joy (1984) and American Cousins (2003).

Dr. Pasquale Iannone is Teaching Fellow in Film Studies at the University of Edinburgh. His specialisms include European cinema (British, French and Italian in particular), videographic film criticism as well as film sound and music. Pasquale is also an experienced critic and broadcaster, regularly contributing reviews and features to Sight & Sound and various BBC radio programmes. Pasquale’s film curation includes several seasons at Filmhouse and Glasgow Film Theatre and he has collaborated on events with the Edinburgh International Film Festival, BFI Southbank, Southbank Centre, The Barbican and the Institute of Contemporary Arts amongst others.

Lucinda Byatt

Historian & 

Italian-English translator

 

Enchantments of Circes: the Fork and Italian Table Manners

There is a time-honoured tradition in food history that Catherine de Medici and the cooks who accompanied her to France in 1533, where she married the future Henri II, introduced Italian cookery to the French court and brought with her the fork.  The use of forks in northern Europe only became widespread in the later seventeenth century. Like most of Europe, sixteenth-century Italy also saw an explosion of printed works, among which – and of particular interest to us – is the genre known as conduct books, or household treatises.

The technical virtuosity demanded of the professional carver is vividly highlighted in a series of late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century treatises. Reminiscent of the Italian art of fencing, the carver’s art and the “quality of the display and the precision of the operation” were intended to magnify the glory of the court. Table manners were a crucially important aspect of dining. One of the most popular etiquette books of the period was Il Galateo (1558) by Giovanni Della Casa. We will look at examples and end by examining the influence of Italian etiquette and ceremonial dining north of the Alps.

Lucinda Byatt holds a Ph.D in History from the European University Institute in Italy and is a historian and Italian-English Translator. Her other roles include production editor of ‘Food and History’. She has taught translation at Honours and masters level since 2012. 

John Gordon

Short Course Tutor in Philosophy and Classics

Luxury, Taste and Politeness

In the early eighteenth century three related ideas were in vogue in England: Luxury, Taste, and Politeness. The developing commercial society at this time made available luxurious new goods – and a key element of this was foodstuffs: the rise of coffee-houses and tea-houses at this time was part of this trend. The nouveau-riche met in coffee houses to display their taste, and to practice the virtue of politeness (this being a key concern of the journal The Spectator – which was read aloud in the coffee houses). Rules of dining were established – and were adhered to strictly in the dining clubs which came into existence at this time. Eating was no longer a matter of mere nutrition: what one ate, how one ate it, and with whom, were all now taken to be of great importance.

John holds a general Arts degree from the Open University, and a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Edinburgh. He has been teaching at the university since 1989, and is currently a tutor in Philosophy and Classics in the University’s Centre for Open Learning.

 

Carina Dahlstrom-Mair

Swedish Language Tutor

 

 

Light and Summer in a Bottle

Scandinavians love being in nature and the great outdoors - not just looking at it! They have a long standing tradition of foraging for food and preserving it whether bottling, jam-making or with alcohol (e.g. sloe gin).  The idea of preserving berries, fruit and vegetables is not only a necessity of survival in terms the vitamins and health benefits but also that bottled food is pleasing to the eye - it’s beautiful. There is poetry and light in a jar of “nature’s gold” which is what Swedes call cloudberry jam and the deep ruby red colour of rosehips are jewels. And of course without these preserves we Scandinavians wouldn’t have survived the long winters!

Preserving a little bit of summer’s goodness; the memories of the long light evenings; the scents of the forest and the tastes of nature’s larder is at the heart of the Scandinavian sense of aesthetics. The same idea lies behind the simplicity and functionality of beautifully made and designed furniture, lighting, living spaces and architecture which makes Scandinavian design so universally sought after.

Carina Dahlstrom-Mair is Swedish and holds an MSc. in Modern Languages. She taught Spanish, Swedish and English (EFL) at International Schools for many years and has lived and worked in Europe, East Africa and the USA. Teaching brought her to Scotland 18 years ago with six years at Aberdeen University, and involvement with the Centre for Lifelong Learning at Edinburgh University since 2011.

She is an active member of the Scottish-Swedish Society and edits their newsletter. She is passionate about art, film, food and languages, and travels regularly between Sweden, Spain and Scotland.

ABOUT THE EVENT

MEET EAT DRINK THINK was devised and developed by Jim Mooney, Course Organiser at the Centre for Open Learning at the University of Edinburgh in collaboration with Edinburgh Food Studio

THE FESTIVAL OF CREATIVE LEARNING

The event is offered part of the University of Edinburgh’s Festival of Creative Learning which takes place from 20-24th February across the its campuses and beyond. For more information go to

http://www.festivalofcreativelearning.ed.ac.uk/

THE CENTRE FOR OPEN LEARNING

The University’s Centre for Open Learning offer daytime and evening short courses for adults, open to all. Subjects range from archaeology to society and politics, art workshops and a variety of language courses offered at many levels.

Further details on the short courses available can be found at

http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/short-courses

A themed dining event to celebrate the contribution that Europe and Europeans have made to Scottish culture and cuisine, jointly hosted by the Centre for Open Learning at The University of Edinburgh, and the Edinburgh Food Studio.

Guests from the University of Edinburgh will bring ideas and points, providing inspiration for the kitchen, and discussion points for the dining table - more info to follow.

Dinner starts at 8pm, and guests are welcome from 7:30pm onwards. The set menu costs £42, and an optional drinks pairing menu will be available for £35.

To book the “Meet, Eat, Drink, Think” on either 23, 24, 25 February email book@edinburghfoodstudio.co or call 0131 258 0758. To avoid disappointment, please book in advance and let us know of your dietary requirements.

Earlier Event: February 16
StrippedBack
Later Event: March 3
Salento Challenge